ISOLATION STATION CAPSULE #04: Writing as Practice
ISOLATION STATION CAPSULE #04: Writing as Practice
ISOLATION STATION CAPSULE #04: Writing as Practice
ISOLATION STATION CAPSULE #04: Writing as Practice
ISOLATION STATION CAPSULE #04: Writing as Practice
ISOLATION STATION CAPSULE #04: Writing as Practice
ISOLATION STATION CAPSULE #04: Writing as Practice
ISOLATION STATION CAPSULE #04: Writing as Practice
ISOLATION STATION CAPSULE #04: Writing as Practice
ISOLATION STATION CAPSULE #04: Writing as Practice
ISOLATION STATION CAPSULE #04: Writing as Practice
ISOLATION STATION CAPSULE #04: Writing as Practice
ISOLATION STATION CAPSULE #04: Writing as Practice
ISOLATION STATION CAPSULE #04: Writing as Practice
ISOLATION STATION CAPSULE #04: Writing as Practice
ISOLATION STATION CAPSULE #04: Writing as Practice

ISOLATION STATION CAPSULE #04: Writing as Practice

Regular price
$330.00
Sale price
$330.00
Quantity must be 1 or more

As we all hunker down into some necessary social distancing, here at Perimeter we’re endeavouring to keep our customers, supporters and pals as enriched as possible. Among some other new kinds of content, over the next few weeks we’ll be curating some great Isolation Station Reading Capsulations to keep you informed about what we’re reading at Perimeter HQ, and hopefully provide some new sources of interest and entertainment in these very strange times!

Our fourth capsule considers Writing as Practice. This capsule contains some fantastic examples of the intersection of art and writing – how visual and written languages compliment one another, or how these 'separate' realms overlap in the context of dialogue or criticism. Each of these titles utilise the practice of writing in compelling and experimental ways.

Each of these titles are available for individual purchase through the web store, or as a specially priced bundle ($330 with free domestic shipping).

Teju Cole – Fernweh

The picturesque vistas and apparent stability of Switzerland have made it an elusive subject for contemporary photography. Over a five-year period, Teju Cole found a distinctly new way to look at a country that has been the quintessence of tourist experience for almost two centuries. Fernweh muses on the German word for a longing to be elsewhere. Cole’s meditative and scrupulously composed work, made with colour film, is evocative of the hidden history of the Alpine nation as well as of its highly curated terrain. With photographs shot in every corner of the country, Fernweh creates a vision of Switzerland that, though largely devoid of human presence, is rich in human traces; none more so than Cole’s own distinct way of seeing. (MACK – London)

Alan Huck – I walk toward the sun which is always going down

In Alan Huck’s image-text book, ​I walk toward the sun which is always going down, an unnamed narrator wanders a city in the American Southwest, where their observations and encounters become catalysts for rumination on a wide range of subjects. Shifting between photographs of the city’s peripheries and an interior monologue written in first-person, fragmentary prose, this hybrid essay draws on the ambulatory works of writers such as W.G. Sebald and Annie Dillard, both of whom are incorporated into the network of literary and cultural references interwoven throughout the book’s text. (MACK – London)

Amy Wu – A Cookbook of Invisible Writing

A Cookbook of Invisible Writing, written and designed by Amy Wu, is an introduction to analog steganography, a type of secret writing that is hidden in plain sight. It is an invisible ink colouring book, recipe book, puzzle book and artistic research book. This book also serves as a starter pack to run workshops for those who are interested in alternative forms of communication. A Cookbook of Invisible Writing provides a wide variety of invisible ink recipes and other communication techniques that may be used to subvert surveillance, bypass censorship and make visible the struggles of minorities and other marginalised cultures. Additionally, it aims to inspire communities to develop their own new poetic and playful forms of communication as a way of nurturing social bonds. (Onomatopee – Eindhoven)

Ben Lerner & Alexander Kluge – The Snows of Venice

American author Ben Lerner and German filmmaker and writer Alexander Kluge come from two different generations but share a single passion: an interest in the long-term effects of things. A line from Lerner’s poem “The sky stops painting and turns to criticism” that Kluge was struck by some years ago became the starting point for their first joint book project. Kluge responded to this celestial critique with a story about the technically controlled power of a squadron of bombers bossing the skies over Aleppo, which Lerner answered with a sonnet. Step by step this gave rise to poems, stories, and conversations in which the heavens show their bewitching and threatening qualities. (Spector Books – Leipzig)

Constance De Jong – Modern Love

Influential artist and writer Constance De Jong’s long-neglected 1977 novel, Modern Love, is one thing made up of many: It is science fiction. It is a detective story. It is a historical episode in the time of the Armada and the dislocation of Sephardic Jews from Spain to an eventual location in New York’s Lower East Side. It is a first-person narrator’s story; Charlotte’s story; and Roderigo’s; and Fifi Corday’s. It is a 150-year-old story about Oregon and the story of a house in Oregon. Critically acclaimed in its time, Modern Love is now back in print on the 40th anniversary of its original publication. (Primary Information – New York)

F.R.DAVID Spring 2020: Very Good

F.R.David focuses on the status of writing in contemporary art practice and has a composite nature which consists of both commissioned keynote essays and reprinted texts. The nineteenth issue is edited by Will Holder and Paula Abbott, and will serve as a reader for 'We can still see the horizon (and it’s curved)', a summer residency in Scotland led by the editors. (Uh Books / Kw Institute – Berlin)

Fiction Practice

Fiction Practice explores the radical potential of fiction as a tool for social change through speculative design, afro-surrealism, critical fabulations and alternative pedagogies. (Onomatopee – Eindhoven)